OReilly’s SOLID: Software / Hardware / Everywhere

OReilly’s SOLID: Software / Hardware / Everywhere
Held in the beautiful Fort Mason buildings on the edge of the San Francisco Bay the two day event hosted by O’Reilly Media and sponsored by Autodesk, GE, IBM, Ford and many others was a fascinating mix of intersections between the cloud based open source platforms from old world thing makers to modern things made by leading software companies and everything in-between.  The theme of the conference – The Internet of Things – “Hardware, Software, Everywhere” was in fact alive and well.
Boston DynamicsFirst of note, upon walking into the event was the amount of robots and 3D printed object that were showcased.  From Silicon Valley Robots, Boston Dynamics, Facebook’s Oculus Rift, and Google’s Makani wind generating tethered airplane to Autodesk’s living human tissue 3D bio-printing  with Organovo, it was a circus of technology and bleeding edge objects and systems that bedazzled the viewers form all walks of life.
Autodesk 3D Moto Swimgarm

Autodesk 3D Motorcycle Swingarm

A consistent theme was that most companies were showcasing a similar version of open source platforms to leverage object and data intersections already ubiquitous in the product line up yet previously difficult to access and visualize for the consumer and B2B markets.
OpenXC's use diagram

OpenXC’s use diagram

Ford Motor Company announced OpenXC, an open source access to their cars data for the maker market, and Intel was represented by their recent acquisition of Mashery’s mobile API software and devices, and Blackberry announced at the SolidCon event their new QNX platform stating that the “Internet of Things” was “Just the Beginning”.
To some – the highlight of the event was the Oculus V2 that if you waited in line – as I did  - you could experience the reality of virtual reality and where it is headed – and it is amazing only missing gloves and hand interaction – something that Georgia Tech’s James Hallam could very well bring to it’s own reality  (James also works at THINK.)
The glove has been designed to allow the user to stimulate the fingertips of their affected hand by tapping the fingers of their unaffected hand, using Force Sensing Resistors to trigger Linear Resonance Actuators on the corresponding fingers.

The glove has been designed to allow the user to stimulate the fingertips of their affected hand by tapping the fingers of their unaffected hand, using Force Sensing Resistors to trigger Linear Resonance Actuators on the corresponding fingers.

For others, including me, the most amazing aspect was Andrew Hessel’s work as Autodesk’s Distinguished Researcher of Bio/Nano/Programmable Matter.  Perhaps too much to mention here but in summary – Autodesk and several companies are now not only printing 3D human DNA but also organ tissue as mentioned above as well as anti-viruses, yeast, bones, and so on at a nano level with mapping and programmable inputs at the cellular level.

Projects Cyborg

Project Cyborg

Next year is sure to have flying robots that are responding to the crowd while silently gathering social data patterns and feeding them into free gifts altered on the fly in our walk in bags…who knows? – I guess we will just have to see.
Hope to see you all there next year.
Tom Lamar, Director of Strategic Innovation
THINK Interactive, Inc.